A KREUTZER SONATA

A playwright friend of mine commissioned me to draw the logo/banner for his new play. Using concepts from the piece, I devised the work below. Central to the plot is a conflict of two musical students who must perform together a piece that challenges both their musical skills and their backgrounds. Elana, a dashing young woman, has romantic interests in David her musical partner who sees Elana as a threat to his firm orthodox Jewish laws and traditions. How and if the two work past their differences to play this musical piece unfolds brilliantly in Larry Rinkel’s A KREUTZER SONATA. Showing at the Manhattan Rep, Tuesday March 7, 6:30PM and Sunday March 12, 3:00PM. Link: http://manhattanrep.com/

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Rose VIII

Two good friends of mine recently got married, joining their lives together as a beautiful pair. For their wedding present, I made them this drawing. The beauty of the rose is alluring, so much that the thorns seem soft and maneuverable. Similarly is the love surrounding marriage, there will be difficult “thorny” spots whilst living with someone but the beauty of the rose outshines it all. A small prick is nothing compared to the strength love offers.

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Rose VIII, Yaakov Bressler, 6×8, 2016. Polyacrylic Resin on Paper.

Fluffy Fred Likes Coffee

Inspired by a piece of Miami street art, I spent some time over vacation drawing Fluffy Fred and his coffee because in case you haven’t read the title, Fluffy Fred indeed likes his coffee a lot.

In Fluffy Fred Likes Coffee a cute overweight ape-like man in a fluff suit holds a cup of coffee amidst an off-white background. The combination of sophisticated mannerisms (the coffee & stylish fluff-suit) with guileless complacency (the iodiot-like smug smirk, overweight physique, un-buttoned fluff suit, & wild hair) cast scrutiny and cynicism for western urban cultural values.

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Fluffy Fred Like Coffee, Yaakov Bressler 8.5 x 11, 2016. Ink on Paper.

 

 

Below is the original street art which I based the drawing of. Note, I do not know who to credit it to so I credited to the neighborhood I saw it in.

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Title not known, seen at Wynwood Miami. March 2016.

A League of Her Own

It’s been a while since I’ve engaged in the creative process of visual art. But recently, I picked up the pen and just drew without cause. The result wasn’t so bad.

In “A League of Her Own” a model sits uncomfortably on a blue and purple background, the very color which symbolizes the model’s deviance from typical female empowerment. The only theme concentrated on in this drawing is the discomfort of the model, which is of a hyper-realist perspective. The woman’s boyish-femininity, and loose grasp on typical female empowering devices is what came out during my relaxed drawing session.

A League of Her Own, Yaakov Bressler, 9 x 12, 2014. Ink on Paper.

A League of Her Own, Yaakov Bressler, 9 x 12, 2014. Ink on Paper.

 

And I’ve never done this before, but here are some other takes of the drawing (other than the final draft). Perhaps this will grant you some deeper appreciation for the creative process.

A League of Her Own without a background. Notice the cold isolated feel of the drawing. Perhaps the drawing could've become enshrouded in a red blanket-type background. I did my best to place her in a cold environment. (Perhaps even a self-imposed coldness.)

A League of Her Own without a background. Notice the cold isolated feel of the drawing. Perhaps the drawing could’ve become enshrouded in a red blanket-type background. I did my best to place her in a cold environment. (Perhaps even a self-imposed coldness.)

I edited and "sootened" the drawing via a photo edit. This is the extreme message of the drawing. The idealized jaw bones, eyes, thin arms and gleaming clavicle are hyper-realist takes on the imprisoned emotions of an imagined model.

I edited and “sootened” the drawing via a photo edit. This is the extreme message of the drawing. The idealized jaw bones, eyes, thin arms and gleaming clavicle are hyper-realist takes on the imprisoned emotions of an imagined model.

Faces II

So it turns out that I really enjoy making “Faces.” I have been, and will be, trying to combine features of beauty with that of  disfigurement. Stay tuned and you can be sure to expect more faces…

 

Q: What is her nicest feature?

Q: What is her worst?

Q: Which did you notice first?

Faces II

Faces II, Yaakov Bressler, 5 x 7, 2013. Ink on Paper.